Little Changes Lead to a Healthier Eating Style

Little Changes Lead to a Healthier Eating Style

Most people aren’t born knowing how to pick the right foods to eat. They usually model the behavior of the adults and people around them. As a rule, we tend to eat in the style and patterns that our families do. If mom made pot roast every Sunday and chicken fried steak on Fridays, you might choose to carry on that tradition.

When we asked around at the Walkingspree headquarters, we learned that there are some eating styles that don’t necessarily have to do with a food tradition but a habit. For example, one of our account managers said that her family would eat in front of the television every night. Most of us have eaten (at some point) in front of the television. Some families even consider it “together time” or “family time.” This can work against your health and nutrition in more than one way. If you are just focusing on the television, mindlessly eating, you may keep eating after you are full; resulting in a pattern of overeating. For some children, a bright screen playing a show in front of them is enough to make them drop everything and not eat their dinner at all. Later that evening, they will tell their parents that they are hungry and ask for a snack which is often something unhealthy.

The marketing manager at Walkingspree reported that growing up, her parents always stopped at the convenience store on the corner to get soft drinks before completing errands, going to visit grandma and they would even stop at the same store for another drink on the way home. As an adult, she found herself doing these things with her children: Stopping for a slush at the local Sonic, grabbing a soft drink out of the coolers in the grocery store and, of course, it was a rule that every time she passed a certain BBQ joint, she needed to stop for sweet tea.

Little Changes Lead to Big Results

What eating patterns or habits are comfortable to you simply because you grew up with them?  We all have them and they don’t just go away unless we identify them. The marketing manager in the paragraph above chose to stop drinking regular sodas and switch to diet sodas. It was tough. All her life, for as long as she could remember, she’d drank several Dr. Peppers or Cokes per day. So, it was a very conscious commitment to be healthier. She decided to go for a walk 3-4 times a week. It was usually not more than 30 minutes and involved playing with her son and their dog. Still, it was being active and that counted in a big way! One year later, she was 35 pounds lighter. No strict diet involved. A year after that, she felt that diet sodas were not good for her health either. So, she dropped the diet sodas to become soft drink free. Does it mean her diet is 100% on track now? No. Getting healthier is about making small changes over time. Her kids still ask for soft drinks and colas in the check out line (but not nearly as often) and they accept it easily when she says “not this time.”  They are making small changes little by little just like their mom.

We’re here to tell YOU that making small changes works!

Whether its one change at a time in your eating habits or one step at a time in a walking program, don’t get down on yourself and don’t give up.

Below is a short video about a single parent trying to make the best choices for her family. Her thoughts on changing eating patterns and how to do it are real and genuine. It’s something real people living real lives, with crazy, stress filled schedules can appreciate. Check it out by clicking the picture below and if you want to see other helpful, short videos like this one, be sure to visit www.choosemyplate.gov/videos


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