A Guide to Fall Food Infographic

Fall brings an array of color to your meals with pumpkin, squash, apples and more. The Guide to Fall Food Infographic shows benefits and diet tips for several fall foods.
A Guide to Fall Food
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Mowing the Lawn doesn’t have to be a Chore.

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Office Stretches to do at your Desk

Stretching – underused and often forgotten by most walkers as part of their regular walking routine. It is useful for both injury prevention and injury treatment. If done properly, stretching increases flexibility and this directly translates into reduced risk of injury. When a muscle/tendon group has a greater range of motion passively, it will be less likely to experience tears when used actively.

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Eat Smart! Serving Size Infographic

In today’s world of super size meals, we’ve become used to distorted serving sizes. This infographic will help you determine proper serving sizes when preparing your meals. Don’t forget you can use the Walkingspree Food Tracker to find out how many steps you need to walk to burn off a particular serving of food.

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Eating more fruits and vegetables

Improving eating habits can be as simple as including plenty of color to your plate, according to the American Dietetic Association.

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

THE BASICS:

Fruits and vegetables are edible plants that can be eaten raw, cooked or dried. Increasing the amount of fruits and vegetables in your food plan results in weight loss and fights chronic diseases.

RECOMMENDED SERVINGS:

Guidelines suggest women should eat 1.5-2 cups of fruit and 2-2.5 cups of vegetables. Men should eat 2 cups of fruits, and 2.5-3 cups of vegetables. Bottomline: Aim for five 1-cup servings a day.

THE RESEARCH:

A variety of fruits and vegetables protect you from a variety of health risks, and their color provides a key associated to these benefits. Try to eat some of these at least once a week:

Green produce promotes healthy vision and may reduce cancer risks. Choose avocados, apples, grapes, honeydew, melons, kiwi, limes, artichokes, asparagus, broccoli, green beans, green peppers and leafy greens such as spinach.

Orange and deep yellow promotes healthy vision, immunity, and may reduce cancer risks. Choose apricots, cantaloupe, grapefruits, mangos, papayas, peaches, pineapples, carrots, yellow peppers, yellow corn and sweet potatoes.

Purple and blue has anti-aging benefits and may help with memory, urinary tract health and may reduce cancer risks. Choose blackberries, blueberries, plums, raisins, eggplant, purple cabbage and purple-fleshed potatoes.

Red helps maintain a healthy heart, vision, immunity and may reduce cancer risks. Choose cherries, cranberries, pomegranate, red/pink grapefruit, red grapes, watermelon, beets, red onions, red peppers, rhubarb and tomatoes.

White, tan and brown contain nutrients that promote heart health and may reduce cancer risks. Choose bananas, brown pears, dates, white peaches, cauliflower, mushrooms, onions, parsnips, turnips, white-fleshed potatoes and white corn.

QUICK TIPS:

  • Buy in season, when flavors are at their peak and produce costs less.
  • Buy pre-cut packages of fruits or vegetables for snacks, instead of chips or candy.
  • Keep a bowl of fruit in sight, or wherever you go first to find a snack. If you see them, you will eat them.
  • Add fruit to food you already eat, like cereal, oatmeal, pancakes, yogurt and salads.
  • Add veggies to food you already eat, like pasta dishes, canned soups, frozen pizza.
  • Shred carrots or zucchini into meatloaf, quick bread, muffins.
  • Use chunky salsa instead of thick, creamy snack dips.
  • Dip fruit in yogurt, low calorie pudding, peanut butter.
  • Dip veggies in salsa or low calorie dressings.
  • Fill half your dinner plate with vegetables.
  • Include a green salad with your dinner every night.
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